The centre for inflammation and tissue homeostasis seeks to make the promise of regenerative medicine a reality and replace/repair tissues lost to disease, trauma, or aging.

The Centre for Inflammation and Tissue Homeostasis (CITH) seeks to make the promise of regenerative medicine a reality and replace/repair tissues lost to disease, trauma, or aging. Currently the theme is comprised of three faculty members (Drs. Shravanti Rampalli, Srikala Raghavan, Colin Jamora) and a visiting professor from the Genome Institute of Singapore (Ramanuj DasGupta). Research is centered around two foci: 1. The regulation of cells that mediate tissue regeneration and repair; 2. The study of epithelial homeostasis and immune regulation at barrier surfaces. These studies utilize multiple experimental platforms, but a common model system that is studied is skin homeostasis, regeneration, and repair.

Over the past year important new findings from this centre have begun to unravel the epigenetic mechanisms regulating the epidermal and dermal compartments of the skin that will not only shed light on skin development and homeostasis but also will provide insights in aging and repair. Another exciting project has been initiated to understand the role of tRNA derived small RNA’s (tsRNA’s) in specifying stem cell fates both in early development and in skin. Moreover, novel players that regulate the wound healing response and tissue scarring have been identified that have the potential of allowing one to tailor the wound response according to biomedical need.